New McCall Edited Clayton Reader Gets Preliminary Go Ahead

I have been fortunate as of late; I have gotten the preliminary go ahead from Wipf & Stock to produce a reader for Philip Clayton, who is broadly characterized as a Wesleyan theologian. What follows is the outline of the text as currently constructed. The readings will be shortened, but the ones indicated here will be in the final reader. What do you think?

Philip Clayton is author or editor of nearly two dozen books, as well as author of some two hundred peer-reviewed articles. Clayton earned a joint PhD in philosophy and religious studies from Yale University, and he has held tenured faculty positions in both fields. He has taught at a top liberal arts college (Williams College), in a state university (California State University), and at Claremont School of Theology, where he holds the Ingraham Professor of Theology Chair. He has also previously taught at Harvard University, Cambridge University, and the University of Munich.

This collection of writings will bring into one volume representative samples of the broad range of Clayton’s theology, primarily taken from his monographs. This book will present Clayton’s thought under six headings—Science & Religion; Science, Faith, & God; Panentheistic Reflections on Theology; Science & Emergence; Science, Spirit, & Divine Action; and Progressive Theology—each with six to nine readings. The editor, Bradford McCall, will provide a significant interpretive introduction that both orients readers to Clayton’s theological corpus and also identifies the most important key to understanding Clayton’s theology: his avowal of panentheistic emergentism, and his advocation of a mutually interactive relationship between science and religion. As a thoroughgoing panentheist, he defends an adapted form of process theism that is hypothetical, dialogical, and pluralistic. This perspective reveals that Clayton holds in tension the dominant projections of liberal and postliberal theologies by granting the contextual nature of all truth claims, particularly by acknowledging the hermeneutical nature of all human knowledge.

Throughout his voluminous writings, Clayton develops a constructive Christian theology that is in dialogue with metaphysics, modern philosophy, postmodernity, and science. In his constructive theology, Clayton has produced works that relate to the theory of knowledge, the history of philosophy and theology, the philosophy of science, physics, evolutionary biology, and comparative theology. Below are the poignant chapter titles, along with the corresponding book titles from Clayton’s corpus that are most relevant to each chapter heading; the individual readings will be updated accordingly when the editor has digital copies of all the relevant books. All permissions will be obtained by Clayton himself, ensuring expedient conferral.

The book will be accessible to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. It will also be valuable to specialists in the several areas covered. I could see the reader itself being read in theology and science courses. This could also be read in any number of contemporary theology classes. University libraries, both secular and faith-based, would be interested in this text. Because of Clayton’s significance, such a volume could have a good deal of appeal to a broad readership. However, I would classify its potential readership as mostly academic in nature.

The book has two distinctive features. First, it brings into one volume writings representative of the theology of Philip Clayton. Second, the editor’s introduction will be a contribution to scholarship on Philip Clayton in its own right, not simply an overview of the reader’s contents. The book will be the indispensable one-volume introduction to Clayton’s thought, especially for readers who need an entry point into this theology or who find the prospects of reading all of his monographs too daunting. As such, the book will provide an accessible point of entry into Philip Clayton’s voluminous theological writings. There is no competitor in the field, since no single work by Clayton himself broaches all of the topics represented in the proposed reader.

 

1. Editorial Introduction
a. I will provide a concise introduction to the reader and to Clayton himself. ~3,000 words
 
2. Science & Religion (~21,000 words); 7 readings.
a. Explanation from Physics to Theology: An Essay in Rationality and Religion (Philip Clayton, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989).
i. Select one representative reading from this title of 3,000 words.
 
b. God and Contemporary Science (Philip Clayton, Edinburgh Studies in Constructive Theology; Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans, 1997).
i. “Systematic Theology and Postmodernism,” 1-14.
ii. “What Theologians Can and Cannot Learn from Scientific Cosmology,” 127-161.
 
c. In Quest of Freedom: The Emergence of Spirit. Frankfurt Templeton Lectures 2006 (Philip Clayton, edited by Michael G. Parker and Thomas M. Schmidt; Göttingen, Germany: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2009).
i. “On Religion: A Speech to its Scientifically Cultured Despisers,” 112-132.
 
d. Religion and Science: The Basics (Philip Clayton, 2011); PDF
i. “The Basic Question: Science or Religion, or Science and Religion,” 1-14.
ii. “Science and the World’s Religions,” 43-65.iii. “The Future of Science and Religion,” 152-171.
 
3. Science, Faith, & God (~18,500 words); 6 readings.
a. The Problem of God in Modern Thought (Philip Clayton, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
i. “The Context for Modern Thought About God,” 3-49.
ii. The Personality of God and the Limits of Philosophy,” 501-508.
 
b. Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective (Philip Clayton and Jeffrey Schloss; Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans, 2004).
i. “Biology and Purpose: Altruism, Morality, and Human Nature in Evolutionary Perspectives,” 318-336.
 
c. The Predicament of Belief: Science, Philosophy, and Faith (Philip Claytonand Steven Knapp, Oxford University Press, 2011).
i. “Reason for Doubt,” 1-22.
ii. “The Ultimate Reality,” 23-43.
iii. “Doubt and Belief,” 111-135.
 
4. Panentheistic Reflections on Science & Theology (~21,000 words; words are approximate due to not having an electronic copy of the texts); 7 readings.
a. The Problem of God in Modern Thought (Philip Clayton, Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans, 2000).
i. “Spinoza’s One and the Birth of Panentheism,” 387-401.
 
b. God and Contemporary Science (Philip Clayton, Edinburgh Studies in Constructive Theology; Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans, 1997).
i. “Rethinking the Relation of God and the World: Panentheism and the Contribution of Philosophy,” 82-106.
 
c. In Whom We Live and Move and Have Our Being: Panentheistic Reflections on God’s Presence in a Scientific World (Philip Clayton and Arthur Peacocke, eds. Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans, 2006).
i. “Panentheism in Metaphysical and Scientific Perspective,” 73-94.
ii. “Panentheism Today: A Constructive Systematic Evaluation,” 249-264.
 
d. Panentheism across the World’s Traditions (Loriliai Biernacki and Philip Clayton, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).
i. “Panentheism in the Tapestry of Traditions,” 200-212.
 
e. How I Found God Everywhere: An Anthology of Spiritual Memoirs (Philip Clayton and Andrew Davis, 2018).
 
f. Adventures in the Spirit: God, World, Divine Action (Philip Clayton, Minneapolis, Minnesota: Fortress Press, 2008).
i. “‘Open Panentheism’ and Creation as Kenosis,” 175-184.
 
5. Science & Emergence (~21,000 words); 9 readings.
a. Mind & Emergence: From Quantum to Consciousness (Philip Clayton, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
i. “The Rise and Fall of Reductionism; The Concept of Emergence; The Pre-history of the Emergence Concept; Weak and Strong Emergence,” 1-10.
ii. “Defining Emergence,” 38-46.
iii. “Eight Characteristics of Emergence,” 60-65.
iv. “Emergence in Biology; Emergence in Evolution; Toward an Emergentist Philosophy of Biology,” 78-100.
v. “Toward an Emergentist Theory of Mind,” 128-143.
 
b. The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis from Science to Religion (Philip Clayton and Paul Davies, eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).
i. “Conceptual Foundations of Emergence Theory,” 1-34.
ii. “Emergence from Quantum Physics to Religion,” 303-32.
 
c. Adventures in the Spirit: God, World, Divine Action (Philip Clayton, Minneapolis, Minnesota: Fortress Press, 2008).
i. “Why Emergence Matters: A New Paradigm for Relating the Sciences; Emergent Realities: The Evolution of Life and Mind,” 63-87.
 
d. “Toward a Constructive Christian Theology of Emergence,” Printed out pages.
i. Clayton’s original 6th chapter to Mind & Emergence, but now located in Evolution and Emergence: Systems, Organisms, Persons, edited by Nancey Murphy and William R. Stoeger, SJ (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 316-343.
 
6. Science, Spirit, & Divine Action (~19,000 words); 6 readings.
a. God and Contemporary Science (Philip Clayton, Edinburgh Studies in Constructive Theology; Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans, 1997).
i. “Scientific Causality, Divine Causality,” 188-219.
ii. “A Panentheistic Theory of Divine Action,” 220-231.
 
b. In Quest of Freedom: The Emergence of Spirit. Frankfurt Templeton Lectures 2006 (Philip Clayton, edited by Michael G. Parker and Thomas M. Schmidt; Göttingen, Germany: Vandenhoechk & Ruprecht, 2009).
i. “Co-evolution, Mental Causality, and Human Action: Freedom and the Emergence of Culture,” 60-83.
 
c. Adventures in the Spirit: God, World, Divine Action (Philip Clayton, Minneapolis, Minnesota: Fortress Press, 2008).
i. “Natural Law and the Problem of Divine Action; Actions Human and Divine: Toward a Panentheistic-Participatory Theory of Agency; Can Contemporary Theologians Still Affirm That God (Literally) Does Anything?” 185-228.
 
d. Mind & Emergence: From Quantum to Consciousness (Philip Clayton, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
i. “Going Beyond Emergence; Trading Mind-body Dualism for Theological Dualism; Rethinking Divine Action,” 185-199.
 
e. All That Is: A Naturalistic Faith for the Twenty-First Century (Theology and the Sciences), by Arthur Peacocke, edited by Philip Clayton; hardcopy???
i. “On Divine and Human Agency: Reflections of a Co-laborer,” in All That Is: A Naturalistic Faith for the Twenty-First Century (Theology and the Sciences), Arthur Peacocke, edited by Philip Clayton (Minneapolis, Minnesota: Fortress Press, 2007), 163-175.
 
7. Progressive Theology (~18,000 words); 9 readings.
a. Transforming Christian Theology: For Church And Society (Philip Clayton, 2012).
i. “Getting Clear on What You (Really) Believe,” 1-10.
ii. “Things have Changed, or ‘Toto, we’re not in Kansas Anymore’,” 11-15.
iii. “Why the Answers Must be Theological,” 19-26.
iv. “Postmodernity and Postmodern Believing,” 27-42.
v. “A Theology of Self-Emptying for the Church,” 94-114.
vi. “Toward a Progressive Theology for Christian Activism,” 146-160.
 
b. Organic Marxism: An Alternative to Capitalism and Ecological Catastrophe (Toward Ecological Civilization Book 3) (Philip Clayton and Justin Heinzekehr, Claremont, California: Process Century Press, 2014).
i. “Introducing Organic Marxism,” 3-14.
ii. “Organic Marxism, Process Philosophy, and Chinese Thought,” 155-176.
iii. “The Ecology and Praxis of Organic Marxism,” 193-228.
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New McCall Edited Clayton Reader Gets Preliminary Go Ahead

New Only Moso Co. for Bamboo Shoots

OnlyMoso USA will open another company this month specifically designed to promote and sell the food products that our farmer partners will be harvesting. OnlyMoso Foods focus will be on the retail sale of fresh shoots, healthy drinks, jared products and of course our gluten free, low carb baking flour.

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New Only Moso Co. for Bamboo Shoots