“Charles Sanders Peirce’s Evolutionary Developmental Teleology”

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

 

Abstract: Charles Sanders Peirce’s evolutionary philosophy was not bounded by classical determinism, as he stressed its illogicality. He notes, “We must therefore suppose an element of absolute chance, sporting, spontaneity, originality, freedom, in nature.” In fleshing out my constructive proposal in this paper, I will dialogue with Peirce, drawing from him the view of a developmental teleology, which will then be applied to a modern rendition of teleology that may be palatable for the evolutionary sciences. An “evolutionary developmental teleology” will be proposed, whereby the telos of evolution is seen to be, broadly, increased complexity, a telos of which is ever growing, and is not anthropocentric in its thrust. I also, in the course of this paper, briefly bring to light the Aristotelian four causes, and note its reduction to efficient causality alone in the modern era.

 

 

“Charles Sanders Peirce’s Evolutionary Developmental Teleology”

“A Modern Depiction of Natural Theology”

 

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

 

Abstract: According to Brunner It is the task of our theological generation to “find its way back to a proper natural theology.” He argues that, since God “leaves the imprint of his nature upon what he does,” it follows that it is fundamentally a Christian belief that the “creation of the world is at the same time a revelation, a self-communication of God.” It is relevant to my argument in this paper that Brunner here does not consider his natural theology as proof of God, but rather as consistent with belief in God. Natural theology, fortunately, is enjoying a renaissance, catalyzed both by the intellectual inquisitiveness of natural scientists and the reflections of Christian theologians. Natural theology can be broadly understood as the systematic exploration of a proposed link between the everyday world of our experience and another asserted transcendent reality, an ancient and pervasive idea that achieved significant elaboration in the thought of the early Christian fathers. It offers, for example, an important conceptual framework for the exploration of Christian theology as a rational enterprise and a clarification of how the Christian faith relates to scientific postulates. Natural theology mandates a principled engagement with reality that is theologically and scientifically informed. It has the potential to open up new vistas of understanding between scientific and religious cultures. There remains, however, a widespread perception that Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection marked and continues to mark the end of any viable natural theology, particularly in its classic formulation. But I shall argue in this paper that there is a “wider natural theology” that remains untouched by Darwinian formulations of evolution by natural selection. It is my intention to provide the basic outlines of a workable natural theology that is in dialogue with the biological sciences, particularly the theory of evolution by natural selection.

 

“A Modern Depiction of Natural Theology”

“Thomistic Personalism in Dialogue with Thomas Jay Oord and John Polkinghorne’s Views of Kenosis”

 

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

 

Abstract: According to Karol Wojtyla, the defining characteristic of betrothed love is self-donation. Picking up on Wojtyla’s characterization of betrothed love as self-donation, the bible gives good grounds for illustrating the Spirit as the active agent of God in the world, particularly regarding the Spirit as life-giver and animator of all creation through self-donation (or self-giving). The kenosis of the Spirit into creation amounts to betrothed love through self-donation. Thomas Jay Oord’s depiction of “essential kenosis” makes numerous asseverations that are constructive for depicting love as self-donation. Several years ago, a collection of essays by theologians and scientists explored creation as The Work of Love, pointing to divine action as kenosis. Herein it is asserted that the Spirit has chosen to invite creation into a cooperative relationship, which coalesces with Wojtyla’s conception of love as self-donation. Ultimately, the essence of personal love is transcended by self-giving. In the final analysis, we are given the capacity of self-possession in order to be able to give ourselves away. The essence of the self is to transcend the self through betrothed self-donated love.

 

Keywords: kenosis; self-donation; self-giving; Thomas Jay Oord; John Polkinghorne; Karol Wojtyla

“Thomistic Personalism in Dialogue with Thomas Jay Oord and John Polkinghorne’s Views of Kenosis”

“The God of Chance and Purpose”

 

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

Abstract: I argue that ontological randomness is genuine, and that God does not determine the outcome of every scientifically random event, but instead controls randomness by setting broad boundaries. Through paleontological examination, this paper looks at how randomness shapes the world from the bottom up. However, the phenomena known as convergence indicates that evolution through natural selection may proceed along various paths, but the destinations are few. So then, there is a dichotomy: randomness is constrained within pattern.

Key Words: contingency, convergence, determinism, paleontology, pattern, randomness

“The God of Chance and Purpose”

“Pentecostal Theological Methodology and the Wesleyan Quadrilateral: a Proposed Synthesis”

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

Abstract: Pentecostalism, now entering its second century of existence, has yet to fully adopt a particular theological methodology. Moreover, the Renewal movement likewise has not adopted a particular theological method. As a result, there is a general lack of cohesion and coherence within Pentecostal and Renewal theology. The following essay proffers that the Renewal movement needs to incorporate elements of the Wesleyan Quadrilateral in its theological methodology. This essay will be divided into four main parts, covering the following areas: 1). A study of the theological methodology of primitive Pentecostalism as attested to by Kenneth J. Archer; 2). A characterization of relatively recent developments in Pentecostal theological methodology as seen within PNEUMA: The Journal of the Society for Pentecostal Studies over the last forty years; 3). An examination of the Wesleyan Quadrilateral; and 4). A concluding proposition regarding the incorporation of the Wesleyan Quadrilateral by the Renewal Movement.

 

Key Words: Renewal; Wesleyan Quadrilateral; PNEUMA; Scripture; tradition; reason, experience

“Pentecostal Theological Methodology and the Wesleyan Quadrilateral: a Proposed Synthesis”

“Evolution, Emergence and Final Causality: A Proposed Pneumatico-Theological Synthesis”

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

 

Abstract: It has been said that creation and evolution exhaust the possible explanations for the origin of living things. However, this paper proffers a pneumatological interpretation of emergence, “reading” emergence through theological lens. The reasoning set forth herein is in support of the overall thrust of Neo-Darwinian theory. In order to argue for the coherency of a triangulation between evolution, emergence, and final causality, I herein dialog with proponents of emergence theory, and then I suggest what may be the uniting factor between evolution and emergence: kenosis, understood theologically as a pouring of the Spirit into primal matter.

Keywords: Pneumatology; Final causality; Evolution; Emergence; Kenosis

“Evolution, Emergence and Final Causality: A Proposed Pneumatico-Theological Synthesis”

“Causation, Vitalism and Hume”

 

Below is an abstract of a paper that is currently being reviewed for possible publication in an Academic Journal. I will keep you updated.

 

Abstract: Causation has troubled philosophers since the time of Aristotle, and they have sought to clarify the concept of causation because of its implications for other philosophical issues, as clarity regarding causation is vital for clarity in the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of science, the philosophy of language, as well as the philosophy of logic. Probably the most radical change in the meaning of “cause” occurred during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, in which there emerged a strong tendency to understand causal relations as instantiations of deterministic laws. Prior to the seventeenth century, Western philosophy largely considered the concept of causation as unproblematic, its intelligibility was not an issue, and there were four types of causes: material, efficient, formal, and final. However, in this essay, I note how early modern philosophers, eminently apparent in Hume, reacted to the notion of vitalism and posited a conception of causation in which it and determinism became virtually equivalent, which thereby denied any sort of vitalistic impulse within matter.

 

Keywords: causation; final causality; vitalism; Aristotle; David Hume

“Causation, Vitalism and Hume”